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CPP : Cardiovascular Prevention and Pharmacotherapy

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Review Article
Targets for rescue from fatty acid-induced lipotoxicity in pancreatic beta cells
Seok-Woo Hong, Won-Young Lee
Cardiovasc Prev Pharmacother. 2022;4(2):57-62.   Published online April 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.36011/cpp.2022.4.e9
  • 263 View
  • 10 Download
Abstract PDF
A persistent intake of excess calories increases plasma levels of free fatty acids, particularly the saturated form that has been shown to exert toxic effects on pancreatic beta cells by inducing dysfunction and apoptosis (i.e., lipotoxicity). An insufficient supply of insulin due to beta cell failure is a major factor in the onset and progression of type 2 diabetes; therefore, it is crucial to understand the cellular mechanisms of lipotoxicity to prevent beta cell failure. Many studies on the effects of lipotoxicity have demonstrated the various factors responsible for beta cell impairment, but the mechanisms of dysfunction and apoptosis resulting from lipotoxicity have not been fully described. This review discusses lipotoxicity-induced alterations of cellular mechanisms, and assesses drugs such as incretin mimetics, thiazolidinedione, and clusterin. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of lipotoxicity-induced beta cell failure is useful in guiding the development of new therapeutic targets for diabetes treatment.
Original Articles
Effects of exercise on reducing diabetes risk in Korean women according to menopausal status
Jung-Hwan Cho, Hye-Mi Kwon, Se-Eun Park, Ju-Hwan Yoo, Kyung-Do Han, Eun-Jung Rhee, Won-Young Lee
Cardiovasc Prev Pharmacother. 2022;4(2):75-86.   Published online April 21, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.36011/cpp.2022.4.e8
  • 293 View
  • 9 Download
Abstract PDF
Background
Exercise and estrogen play key roles in preventing diabetes and obesity. Women’s risk of diabetes could increase due to the loss of the protective effect of estrogen after menopause. Therefore, we investigated the relationship of the intensity and frequency of exercise with diabetes risk in Korean women.
Methods
Hazard ratios (HRs) for the development of diabetes were analyzed in 926,807 premenopausal and 1,188,346 postmenopausal women without diabetes over the age of 40 who underwent the Korean National Health Examination in 2009 and were followed up until 2018. The number of days of physical activity according to exercise intensity and metabolic equivalent of task-minutes per week (MET-min/wk) were calculated.
Results
In total, 38,096 premenopausal (4.1%) and 120,605 postmenopausal (10.2%) women were newly diagnosed with diabetes. Regardless of menopausal history, the risk of diabetes was significantly lower in groups with higher MET-min/wk than in sedentary participants (0 MET-min/wk, reference), although this effect disappeared in postmenopausal women with the highest level of MET-min/wk (MET-min/wk ≥1,500) after adjusting for all variables (HR, 1.0; 95% confidence interval, 0.97–1.02). Participants who exercised for more than 1 day per week had a significantly lower risk of diabetes, regardless of the intensity. However, this benefit was lost in women with near-daily exercise (≥6 days/wk).
Conclusions
Exercise was effective in preventing diabetes in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women. A moderate amount of exercise should be actively encouraged to lower the risk of diabetes in women, especially after menopause, while simultaneously considering the insignificant benefits of excessive exercise.
Effects of physical activity on cardiovascular outcomes and mortality in Korean patients with diabetes: a nationwide population-based cohort study
Inha Jung, Sun Joon Moon, Hyemi Kwon, Se Eun Park, Kyung-Do Han, Eun-Jung Rhee, Won-Young Lee
Cardiovasc Prev Pharmacother. 2022;4(1):42-55.   Published online January 20, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.36011/cpp.2022.4.e3
  • 981 View
  • 21 Download
Abstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Since a sedentary lifestyle is considered a modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), physical activity (PA) is recommended for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients to prevent CVD. We investigated the association between different levels of PA and the risk for CVD and all-cause mortality in patients with T2DM using nationwide data.
Methods
We examined health examination data and claims records of 2,745,637 participants with T2DM at baseline from the Korean National Health Insurance Service who underwent health examinations between 2009 and 2012. We excluded subjects with a history of myocardial infarction or stroke. Each participant was asked to report their weekly PA levels according to three categories: vigorous, moderate, and walking. The incidence of CVD and death was analyzed until 2017.
Results
The risk of CVD was lower in regular exercisers than in nonexercisers after adjusting for confounding variables. A dose-response trend was evident in the association between the degree of PA and CVD risk. All categories of PA were inversely associated with CVD risk and mortality. The reduction in CVD risk and all-cause mortality was more profound in patients aged ≥65 years.
Conclusions
Augmenting PA might have positive effects on the prevention of CVD and all-cause death, especially in the elderly. The benefits of PA were consistently observed in various subgroups regardless of the presence of chronic conditions. Therefore, clinicians should encourage elderly patients with T2DM to increase their daily PA.
Review Articles
Diabetes in People with Disabilities: a Call for Action
Inha Jung, Eun-Jung Rhee, Won-Young Lee
Cardiovasc Prev Pharmacother. 2021;3(4):82-85.   Published online October 31, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.36011/cpp.2021.3.e13
  • 439 View
  • 14 Download
Abstract PDF
Previous researchers have suggested that people with disabilities have a higher prevalence and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus than the general population. As diabetes is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), developing strategies to prevent and delay its occurrence in people with disabilities is important to reduce the burden of CVD. However, people with disabilities are often excluded from studies and have received little attention from public health authorities and researchers. These unmet needs for health care and being left out of research may affect the progression of diabetes in people with disabilities. Herein, we would like to briefly discuss the increased risk of diabetes and related conditions in people with disabilities and suggest that more attention should be given to this population.
Body Weight Change and Cardiovascular Disease: Effect of Weight Gain, Weight Loss, and Weight Cycling
Jung-Hwan Cho, Eun-Jung Rhee, Won-Young Lee
Cardiovasc Prev Pharmacother. 2021;3(4):73-81.   Published online October 31, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.36011/cpp.2021.3.e12
  • 1,109 View
  • 50 Download
Abstract PDF
Obesity is an independent risk factor for the development and progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Various cardiovascular outcomes are related to the association between body weight change and CVD. Metabolically healthy obese individuals could have a better prognosis in terms of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than metabolically unhealthy obese individuals. Smoking cessation causes significant weight gain and consequent deterioration of the metabolic profile despite not impairing the cardiovascular benefits. Intentional weight loss has a consistent cardiovascular protective effect, but unintentional weight loss due to progressive catabolism and loss of muscle mass could be associated with poor cardiovascular outcomes. Obese individuals who are successful in losing weight with subsequent regain (weight cycling) could have an unfavorable cardiometabolic profile and the risk of CVD. Further studies are needed to evaluate the impact of weight changes on CVD by identifying unknown pathophysiology and to decide appropriate management and interventions for various phenotypes of weight change.
Special Article
Inflammation in Metabolic Diseases and Insulin Resistance
Won-Young Lee
Cardiovasc Prev Pharmacother. 2021;3(2):31-37.   Published online April 30, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.36011/cpp.2021.3.e5
  • 730 View
  • 7 Download
Abstract PDF
Increased inflammation and insulin resistance are commonly observed in obesity and diabetes. Inflammatory mediators secreted by the adipose tissue contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Free fatty acids and pro-inflammatory cytokines from adipose tissue inhibit the intracellular insulin signaling pathway, further contributing to the progression of diabetes. Meta-analysis studies show that high sensitivity C-reactive protein can be used as a predictor of future all-cause mortality, including cardiovascular and cancer mortality. In addition to the discovery of novel therapeutic methods targeting inflammatory mediators, basic lifestyle interventions, such as regular exercise, healthy eating, and proper weight control, are absolutely crucial for reducing inflammation and preventing mortality.
Review Article
Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes
Jong Dai Kim, Won-Young Lee
Cardiovasc Prev Pharmacother. 2020;2(3):63-76.   Published online July 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.36011/cpp.2020.2.e10
  • 503 View
  • 5 Download
Abstract PDF
The number of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing worldwide and that in Korea, particularly, has shown an exponential increase with a rise in the older population. The diabetic population is predicted to soar up to 6 million by 2050. The prevalence of diabetes among Korean adults is approximately 15%, while that of prediabetes is 25%, with a total prevalence of 40%. As 40% of the prediabetes cases subsequently progress to T2D, prevention through proactive interventions at the prediabetes stage is essential to reduce the socioeconomic burden due to T2D and the complications of diabetes. With regard to the prevention of T2D, new findings have been published related to the implementation of lifestyle interventions such as exercise and diet as well as drug treatments and surgeries, which have deepened our understanding of the prevention of T2D. Based on published evidence, this review aimed to examine the methods used in the prevention of diabetes.

CPP : Cardiovascular Prevention and Pharmacotherapy